BOOK REVIEW: Genesis by W.A. Harbinson

This is one of those books which comes along from time to time that I can get totally engrossed in, not wanting to put it down for a second. I’d read some other reviews (most of which were positive) and it sounded fascinating, being an alternate history sort of story founded in both actual events and myth. Add to this the fact that I had a well-used paperback copy sitting idle on my bookshelf and here we are, reviewing another fun book.


How Will Our Religions Handle the Discovery of Alien Life?

For the religious, knowing that life on Earth is not unique may demand radical new ways of thinking about ourselves: How special and sacred are we? Is Earth a privileged place? Do we have an obligation to care for beings on other planets? Should we convert ET to “my” religion? These questions point to a deeper issue about whether our religions can adapt to the idea that humans are not the only sentient beings in the universe capable of worshiping God.

BOOK REVIEW: Bluebirds: A Battle of Britain Novel by Melvyn Fickling

I’ll cut straight to the chase and say that this is an excellent novel, no doubt about it. While not a new idea it’s a solid World War Two yarn full of the things that make fact-based war stories so fascinating to someone like me who has not had the misfortune of being involved in such events.
Simply a great book to relax with and be reminded of how much was given and sacrificed, and that “never was so much owed by so many to so few”.

55 Essential Space Operas from the Last 70 Years

What makes a science fiction story a space opera? Well, it needs to take place in space obviously, though not necessarily all of the time. Hanging out solely in an arcology on a climate-blasted Earth, or even in a domed city on Mars, doesn’t cut it. Actually, the more space the better; though there are certainly exceptions, a good space opera should span a galaxy or two, or at least a solar system. And an opera has to be grand and dramatic –battling empires, invading aliens, mysterious ancient technology, and grand, sweeping story arcs.

BOOK REVIEW: Waking Gods (Themis Files #2) by Sylvain Neuvel

Bloody hell, I thought that Sleeping Giants was fast-paced! This second book of the Themis Files changes into an even higher gear, the story rocketing along so rapidly that, before I knew it, I was at the end. And with another cliff-hanger for good measure. I read this book, which is slightly longer than the first book, in exactly two sessions. To be fair, I had the excuse of being sick in bed with plenty of time on my hands, but still I didn’t want to put it down and stop the roller coaster ride.

BOOK REIVIEW: Sleeping Giants (Themis Files #1) by Sylvain Neuvel

This is a fun and interesting book, both in the thematic sense and also in the storytelling style. It’s a relatively short sci-fi techno-thriller with what I think has a slight “youthy” feel, but I see this as a good thing, making it accessible to a wider audience of readers. I’d have loved this as a teenage reader just as much as I did as an “older” one. It’s a book that you could give to many readers because it contains solid tropes from the sci-fi genre as well as the fast action entertainment of a thriller. They all mix together rather nicely into a very entertaining story.